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Jillian Anthony is a California girl in New York—writing, reading, seeing, eating, drinking, and obsessing about things.

September 21, 2012 at 3:36pm
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The image appears on T-shirts and cellphone covers, coffee mugs and wine labels. And the 80-year-old pensioner who just weeks ago was mortified by the global stir she created with her botched restoration of a fresco of Christ is now looking to get a piece of the action.
The church painting in the town of Borja was for decades a little-known piece of religious art by a minor Spanish artist. Now that Cecilia Gimenez has disfigured it, it has found a new fate as an international icon — used to sell products around the world.
Gimenez’s lawyers have begun investigating whether all the notoriety may be turned to profit, albeit with an aim to help charity.
The fresco depicts Christ with a crown of thorns before crucifixion, in a style known as “Ecce Homo” (Behold the Man). It stood in peaceful obscurity in the Misericordia Church sanctuary since it was painted in 1930 — until Gimenez, a longtime devotee of the work, decided it needed to be rescued from flaking caused by the damp church air.
Word of the artistic travesty spread across the world, and the solemn Ecce Homo quickly took on a less dignified identity: “Ecce Mono.” Behold the Monkey.
Then something unexpected happened.
The town morphed into a tourism destination for people who want to see the restoration. The crush has been so big that the Sancti Spiritus foundation that owns the church and sanctuary recently started charging admission: one euro per visitor. Meanwhile, Internet entrepreneurs have quickly moved in to cash in on the phenomenon, printing “Ecce Mono” on a seemingly endless range of products to sell online.
Gimenez’s lawyers say she has no interest in a cut of what the foundation is charging people to see the fresco. But they are investigating possible copyright infringements of what she created. If she has rights, said lawyer Antonio Val Carreras Rivera, Gimenez could pursue payments from those using the image to sell products, although whatever she earns would go to charity.

GET ME AN ECCE HOMO MUG IMMEDIATELY

The image appears on T-shirts and cellphone covers, coffee mugs and wine labels. And the 80-year-old pensioner who just weeks ago was mortified by the global stir she created with her botched restoration of a fresco of Christ is now looking to get a piece of the action.

The church painting in the town of Borja was for decades a little-known piece of religious art by a minor Spanish artist. Now that Cecilia Gimenez has disfigured it, it has found a new fate as an international icon — used to sell products around the world.

Gimenez’s lawyers have begun investigating whether all the notoriety may be turned to profit, albeit with an aim to help charity.

The fresco depicts Christ with a crown of thorns before crucifixion, in a style known as “Ecce Homo” (Behold the Man). It stood in peaceful obscurity in the Misericordia Church sanctuary since it was painted in 1930 — until Gimenez, a longtime devotee of the work, decided it needed to be rescued from flaking caused by the damp church air.

Word of the artistic travesty spread across the world, and the solemn Ecce Homo quickly took on a less dignified identity: “Ecce Mono.” Behold the Monkey.

Then something unexpected happened.

The town morphed into a tourism destination for people who want to see the restoration. The crush has been so big that the Sancti Spiritus foundation that owns the church and sanctuary recently started charging admission: one euro per visitor. Meanwhile, Internet entrepreneurs have quickly moved in to cash in on the phenomenon, printing “Ecce Mono” on a seemingly endless range of products to sell online.

Gimenez’s lawyers say she has no interest in a cut of what the foundation is charging people to see the fresco. But they are investigating possible copyright infringements of what she created. If she has rights, said lawyer Antonio Val Carreras Rivera, Gimenez could pursue payments from those using the image to sell products, although whatever she earns would go to charity.

GET ME AN ECCE HOMO MUG IMMEDIATELY

Notes

  1. jillathrilla posted this