Thrillafest

About   Published Work   Posts You'll Dig    Ask Jilla   

California girl in New York.

August 3, 2014 at 10:43pm
1,430 notes
Reblogged from semiserious

semiserious:

This Brazilian 4th grader doing drag for his school’s talent show is everything! Seriously wait until the end!

I can ONLY WISH to have a child this fabulous.

10:30pm
0 notes

9:59pm
359 notes
Reblogged from thesyllabusforclass

(Source: thesyllabusforclass, via newyorkisforlovers)

8:57pm
0 notes

American Summer: Before Air-Conditioning →

Fascinating. This is my second summer in NYC surviving without an air conditioner, but the first one I was desperately penny-pinching and this one my home stays rather cool, on top of it being a pretty mild summer. After reading this I’m counting my blessings.

8:51pm
3 notes

One night when I was working at the bar, a man pulled a knife out.

An old man with a long white beard came into the bar and drank PBRs for a few hours. When he ordered his drink, I noticed his hand fly to his neck, and his voice sounded alien, deep and rough like it was being scraped over a gravel road. 

Some people come into the bar almost smelling of the acute pain in their lives. I’m their bartender, and I often feel a responsibility to help fill whatever hole they’re struggling with. They tell me their secrets and aches and desires, lips loosened by alcohol and the comfort of a stranger. 

This man was no different. His voice sounded threatening and I assumed he probably doesn’t have a lot of conversations with people who are willing to sit and listen, especially young women. He was kind to me, so I tried to extend extra kindness to him. I listened to him talk about his past. He was an aging hippie and spoke repeatedly of being in the Vietnam war. I tried to imagine something happening to me that was so formative in my life I would still speak of it in regular conversation 40 years later. 

He offered me some weed. I told him I didn’t smoke. I asked if he did. His response was to pull aside his beard, showing me his gaping tracheotomy hole. “I’m not a quitter,” he said, using his fingers to cover the void. The overbearing sadness and stupidity of that statement smacked me across the face. 

Later, he placed something on the bartop that looked like a giant bullet. “What’s that?” I asked. He brought a finger to his lips, imploring me to be quiet. I leaned toward him, and in an instant a four-inch blade flew out of the bullet casing. I jumped back. “I got it in Vietnam,” he said, quickly tucking the blade away again. I laughed nervously and walked away to wash dishes. Though he didn’t mean any harm, he had frightened me. I think another bartender might have asked him to leave. Maybe I should have as well. 

When he was done drinking, he thanked me for our conversation and left me a $10 tip.

1:29pm
5,784 notes
Reblogged from fuckyeah1990s

(via fuckyeah1990s)

August 1, 2014 at 1:19pm
1 note

"Maybe it’s time to get a boyfriend," she said to herself after telling her cat all about her recent trip to San Francisco.

July 16, 2014 at 1:16pm
615 notes
Reblogged from explore-blog

Be relentless without being obnoxious. Be ambitious, and own your ambition—that goes especially for women. It’s okay to say, ‘I want greatness.’

— 

A conversation with the wonderful Roxane Gay on The Great Discontent. The above calls to mind Debbie Millman’s memorable advice to “imagine immensities.”

Previous TGD interviews have included Debbie MillmanAustin KleonJohn Maeda, and yours truly.

(via explore-blog)

(Source: explore-blog, via aprilmayparker)

July 14, 2014 at 11:27pm
9 notes
Reblogged from socialsurvival

All I could do during those three days was talk long-distance to the boy I already knew I would never marry in the spring. I would stay in New York, I told him, just six months, and I could see the Brooklyn Bridge from my window. As it turned out, the bridge was the Triborough, and I stayed eight years.

— Joan, “Goodbye To All That” (via socialsurvival)

12:00pm
1 note
I adore these images of female empowerment by Brazilian graphic designer Carol Rossetti.

I adore these images of female empowerment by Brazilian graphic designer Carol Rossetti.